Which Facial Treatments ACTUALLY WORK?

Which Facial Treatments ACTUALLY WORK? My wife complains that going for a facial is more stress than bliss nowadays. While most beauty options are a matter of personal choice entirely, the sheer number of treatment mixtures available can be overwhelming. Just how many options at the wonder salon are designed with real skin care benefits in mind? Here’s a closer take a look at a few of the latest styles in facial treatments, do they live up to their hype, and does the science really show they work? A gold facial is a facial therapy involving the application of a sheet of 24-karat gold leaf to the facial skin.

Said to have been an age-old Ayurvedic epidermis treatment, even historic Egyptian beauty Cleopatra was likely to owe her perfect pores and skin to gold facials (this reality has been disputed by Egyptologists). Claims because of this treatment include improved pores, and skin elasticity, relaxed wrinkles, scar, and blemish lightening, anti-pollution cell therapy, and a younger glow.

Gold facials are touted as the best in luxurious epidermis treatments, with modern techniques such as recovery and nano-misting light put into boost the absorption of beneficial nutrients. This strikes me as curious; if yellow metal was such a beneficial therapy that has been used since historic times, how come there the necessity for the nano-mist that helps the yellow metal to be ingested?

Gold is also a material that is proven to cause contact dermatitis (see this research) and is often considered second only to nickel as an allergenic. Diamond skin products are very popular, because of the love factor possibly. There is little evidence, however, that diamond-studded potions and creams are worth the inflated price. Diamonds have one proven use in skin care: as an exfoliator. Diamonds give great exfoliation and do not degrade as easily as sand or other exfoliating tools, so are used by dermatologists often. There are, however many other products that are well for daily exfoliation purposes just, and cost much less, too.

Diamond facials that claim to provide more benefits than exfoliation should be studied with a grain of sodium. Some aesthetic products do contain diamonds for their light-reflecting and illuminating properties, but these benefits are only temporary, long lasting only as long as the diamonds stick to the skin. Diamonds don’t provide any nutritive or healing benefits as they cannot be absorbed into the dermis.

Snail mucus gels and facials are arguably the pattern with the best ‘ick’ factor, but proponents swear by their collagen-boosting and hydrating properties. With a snail facial, live snails are allowed to crawl all over the real face, covering it with slime as each goes. The snail gel provides the same benefits in a container for daily use. Snail mucus is rich in antioxidants apparently, beneficial hyaluronan and proteins, a hydrating element like hyaluronic acid.

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Hyaluronic acid solution is a successful pores and skin moisturizing agent, but hyaluronan substances are significantly larger and can’t be soaked up into the pores and skin. The snails used for the facials are supposedly a special breed from Africa, fed with organic foods, and kept in a sterile environment. But how do you purify a snail before it is applied by one to your face?

Could snail mucus be the response to all your maturing woes? Some dermatologists are concerned about the risk of cross-contamination because the snails will be utilized again and again on different clients’ faces. Others improve the relevant question of allergies to the protein molecules from the snail slime. Like other treatments, there are many who’ll swear to the treatment beautifying benefits, of having less helping medical evidence regardless. Dr. Williams Stebbins, a teacher of dermatology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center says effects of the treatment are likely only temporary without long-lasting benefits. Another trending component which claims ancient origins is bee venom.

There have been many scientific studies into the medicinal applications of bee venom, for the treatment of hyperallergy and arthritic conditions especially. Bee venom contains compounds that have powerful anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory effects, as well as various peptides, enzymes, and proteins. Used in skin care, it is said to work just like a cream version of Botox, blocking nerve signals that cause muscle contractions.